Alyria's Interior: Simple Elegance

 

What we had in mind when we designed Alyria's interior was a simple layout that would work well for day-sailing as well as passage making. The look we wanted was simple, honest elegance with a robust build. From the white painted steel hanging knees supporting the mainmast, to the ample sold honduras mahogany chart table, everything is simple and strongly built. 

Looking aft we see the gallley, settees, and quarter berths, along with the chart table to starboard. Alyria is full of the stuff of life in this shot; not exactly boatshow ready! The bronze poll in the forground keeps the crew from falling on the soapstone and brass wood stove. The wood stove keeps Alyria warm and dry in any weather! The settees can be used as berths by pulling the lee cloths out from under them and using the brass hooks to secure them to the overhead.

In this picture you can see the bookcase to port and the location of the portside quarter berth which is just behind (outboard) of the Mahogany backrest. The upper locker in the top of the pic is handy to the companionway and there is one on each side. All of the sliding doors on the cabinets are made to ventilate.

This shot gives a good overview of Alyria's interior looking forward. The main saloon and galley are separated but together at the same time. A drop leaf table (one leaf folded down in this picture) is large enough to seat several people comfortably and has easy access to the galley. The bronze pole in the foreground supports the table and also is great to grab onto in a seaway. By the way, that's me in the galley and I am well over 6 feet tall!

There's the wood stove and you can also see the 3 burner propane Force 10 cook stove with oven. If you look closely you can see the dresser (to port) in the forward cabin. Not shown in this picture is the head, which is opposite the dresser. There is also a hanging locker just outboard of the wood stove to starboard and a secondary bookcase above the hanging locker. We used that one mainly for navigation books since it's so close to the chart table.